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Water Misting From Near Distributor... Overheating?
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SprintStar  



Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2003 2:20 pm    Post subject: Water Misting From Near Distributor... Overheating? Reply with quote

Hello Guys,

3 new problems.

I had the '81 Turbo die on me today. I wriggled the DITC box behind the radio and it run ok for a while till the 2nd thing happened.

I was in a traffic jam and since I wriggled the connector, it's been behaving ok. But then I started to misfire.... When the jam cleared, I stopped by the road shoulder to try redo the connector. And I heard a hissing sound. I opened the hood to see water misting and spraying out from behind and below the distributor (spark, not fuel) area.

I checked my coolant level in the expansion box. Max but clearly water was dripping down on the ground close to where the wastegate would be. Is the rear coolant flange leaking? How do I fix it? Remove and re-gasket?

And is there anyway to fix the DITC connector for good?

Last problem. After I filled up the tank I noticed a leak to the rear (rear is rear). It seems to come from quite high, so I doubt it's the fuel pump. Accumulator? Well, the leak seems to have stopped for a while. I will continue to monitor. Is there an overflow system?

Thanks and have a nice weekend!

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jl924t  



Joined: 03 Nov 2002
Posts: 214
Location: Surrey, BC Canada

PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2003 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The coolant leak could be you rear flange but could also be a heater core hose. There are 2 there. I would remove the intake manifold to fix. Fuel leak could be from the vent tube. There is a vent for the fuel tank or filler neck. The vent is a tube that exits behind the rear wheel, beside the drain tube for your sun roof. If it doesn't vent to the outside and it is left in the well you will smell fuel in the cab.
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John Brown  



Joined: 07 Nov 2002
Posts: 903
Location: Leesburg VA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2003 1:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The hoses behind the engine are very often never replaced until they burst. As mentioned above there are the 2 hoses which go into/through the firewall to the heater core; and there are the hoses and tubing which run to the crossflow tube (under the intake manifold. As you are about to find out: they are VERY hard to access. All I can say is good luck. And BELIEVE that since one has failed you should replace them ALL. Think about replacing the heater control valve while you are in there too. Since it will be out anyway check the functioning of any vacumn or temperature switches that are installed on the tube in your particular year.

Most likely candidates for fuel leaks. If only directly after filling, or, check it first cause it's the easiest to see: the drain line mentioned above. Runs from the rubber boot which surrounds the filler neck down to the inner fender will. The rubber boot cracks where the drain line attaches. Only solution is to replace the boot. You can access by lifting the carpet over the right (passenger) side well. Next on my list is the rubber 'S' or 'Z' shaped hose from the tank to the fuel pump. Easy to get at. Not so easy to get at is the general area above the fuel pump - not usual but look. Then on up to the fuel accumulator. Mounted to a bracket up on the crossmember right (passenger) side of the transmission. The bottom will be wet or dripping or stained or all. The fittings are difficult to get at (unless you pull the transmission). Use quality wrenches and try some penetrating oil for a few days.

The bad news. I made a recent discover pulling some tanks. The similarities make me think that even though my sample size is small the observations are valid still. All of these cars smell and we are forever talking about it. Some fixes seem to have reduced but not completely eliminated the odor problem on the older cars. There is a vent fitting exactly in the center front top of the tank. So not accessible without completely removing the tank. To this fitting is a very short (50mm) braided hose which connects to a plastic pipe. The pipe is triangular about 25mm on a side and runs to the right side of the tank then into another hose (which is the vent hose to the filler neck). The very short (50mm) braided hose is porus. I speculate that because it is so short and under some strain the movement and vibration cause it to breakdown faster than the longer hose of the same material. Because the fitting is in a recess the fuel which sloshes up and migrates through the porus hose just sits in the recess and smells. It never 'leaks' down so you would know about it!

I really don't see why the hose was not simply run the length. In which case I think it would still be good. (All the other hoses still look good after all these years.) There must be some reason as the plastic pipe is just to special. However, I note that the 944 plastic tank just uses a lot of hoses for the venting.

In any case. I may have stumbled onto a root cause for all those fuel fumes. Wish it were easier to get at.
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SprintStar  



Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2003 2:12 am    Post subject: You may be right! Reply with quote

jl924t wrote:
The coolant leak could be you rear flange but could also be a heater core hose. There are 2 there. I would remove the intake manifold to fix. Fuel leak could be from the vent tube. There is a vent for the fuel tank or filler neck. The vent is a tube that exits behind the rear wheel, beside the drain tube for your sun roof. If it doesn't vent to the outside and it is left in the well you will smell fuel in the cab.


Hello JL, you may be right. It doesn't look so much like it's from the rear flange, more like some hose. But would my car still have a heater core? My controls on the cabin don't work no more and I don't need heat here in Singapore. But I'll tear down to check. Are the hoses generic or Porsche only?

And the more important question is WHY did it happen? Simply old hoses or a sign that worse things are to come? What should I do 'while I'm at it'? Thanks.

As for the fuel tank vent, it has stopped leaking now. Should I stop worrying too? Think isn't the first time I've filled her up to the neck but it certainly is the first time I'm seeing this drip!

Hope your weekend's better than mine...

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Smoothie  



Joined: 01 Jan 2003
Posts: 8030
Location: DE (the one near MD, PA, NJ)

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2003 2:54 am    Post subject: Re: You may be right! Reply with quote

SprintStar wrote:
But would my car still have a heater core? My controls on the cabin don't work no more and I don't need heat here in Singapore. But I'll tear down to check. Are the hoses generic or Porsche only?

And the more important question is WHY did it happen? Simply old hoses or a sign that worse things are to come? What should I do 'while I'm at it'? Thanks.

As for the fuel tank vent, it has stopped leaking now. Should I stop worrying too? Think isn't the first time I've filled her up to the neck but it certainly is the first time I'm seeing this drip!


It should have a heater core even though you don't need it. The hoses back there have some wild twists and turns in them, so you pretty much need Porsche OE replacements - unless you really never need heat..I suppose you could do away with the heater valve and just use a length of hose to loop around and connect the water outlet and inlet on the engine side, eliminating the water flow to the heater core, but that's entirely up to you. It would eliminate any future concern about the heater core developing a leak. To get access back there, you at least need to remove the ignition coil. Old age cracking and other assorted deterioration more than accounts for the hoses failing at this point.

As for the fuel smell - I get it mainly when the tank is filled all the way up. My cheap-easy fix has been to wait for the fuel warning light to come on and then put only 10 gallons of gas in the tank. I do believe the leak/smell problem is more complicated and harder to get at as John mentioned and mine won't be getting the full fix until some time in the future when I have the transmission dropped for some reason.
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SprintStar  



Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2003 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Brown wrote:
As you are about to find out: they are VERY hard to access. All I can say is good luck. And BELIEVE that since one has failed you should replace them ALL. Think about replacing the heater control valve while you are in there too. Since it will be out anyway check the functioning of any vacumn or temperature switches that are installed on the tube in your particular year.


Thank you all who responded. I'll try replace the hoses today and will post updates...

Pray for me!

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Lizard  



Joined: 03 Nov 2002
Posts: 9364
Location: Abbotsford BC. Canada

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2003 8:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sprint dont frett, those hoses are not really all that hard to do, just pull everything that is in the way, ie, coil, vaccum limiter, anything like that
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numbbers  



Joined: 05 Nov 2002
Posts: 1910
Location: Highlands Ranch, Colorado

PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2003 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, if you haven't got to it yet, I have had both problems you seem to have. The coolant leak was from the hose that runs from the back of the engine to the heater control valve, and the gas leak was from the fuel accumulater right in front of the tank. As John Brown says, the hose is a Porsche only item and a PITA to replace. The accumulater was fairly expensive, around $100 US.
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SprintStar  



Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2003 2:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

numbbers wrote:
Well, if you haven't got to it yet, I have had both problems you seem to have. The coolant leak was from the hose that runs from the back of the engine to the heater control valve, and the gas leak was from the fuel accumulater right in front of the tank. As John Brown says, the hose is a Porsche only item and a PITA to replace. The accumulater was fairly expensive, around $100 US.


Any part number for the accumulator? Would like to try my fave VW FLAPS for it. After all, I bought a brand new fuel pump (correct part number) for $70! Hehe... I guess I was lucky then but no harm asking Lady Luck for another hot date, ya?

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Smoothie  



Joined: 01 Jan 2003
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Location: DE (the one near MD, PA, NJ)

PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2003 2:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You should find a small screw in the bottom of the fuel accumulator. To check for a leak there, remove the screw. If fuel drips out, the accumulator's shot. (If it's rusty enough around the screw, you might remove it, but not be able to put it back.)
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SprintStar  



Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2003 3:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lizard wrote:
sprint dont frett, those hoses are not really all that hard to do, just pull everything that is in the way, ie, coil, vaccum limiter, anything like that


Thanks Lizard! I hope to give a positive FR soon!

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SprintStar  



Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2003 3:05 am    Post subject: I think I have a BAD accumulator.... Reply with quote

Smoothie wrote:
You should find a small screw in the bottom of the fuel accumulator. To check for a leak there, remove the screw. If fuel drips out, the accumulator's shot. (If it's rusty enough around the screw, you might remove it, but not be able to put it back.)


Is the fuel accumulator related to my warm start problem? If I leave it parked for less than 15 mins, no problem. More than that but less than a few hours, the engine would fire up and die. I have to turn on the ignition, remove the CIS boot and depress the sensor plate about 10 times to prime the system. I believe the system is not holding enough pressure. Accumulator? Will your test confirm it?

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-nick  



Joined: 16 Nov 2002
Posts: 2699
Location: Cambridge, MA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2003 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say the accumulator is related (if it is bad) but if you're having that much trouble with the warm start, then other components maybe leaking fuel pressure too. -fuel pump check valve, etc.

I concur that the heater core hoses are a PITA to replace.

-nick
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Lizard  



Joined: 03 Nov 2002
Posts: 9364
Location: Abbotsford BC. Canada

PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2003 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you are replacing the old hoses anyway, CUT THEM out then just use a light amount of vasaline or grease to make the hose go on smoothly
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numbbers  



Joined: 05 Nov 2002
Posts: 1910
Location: Highlands Ranch, Colorado

PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2003 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes the accumulator can be related to the start problem, but it usually effects cold start also. I will dig through my old receipts and see if I have a PN for the accumulator.
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