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How to install an aftermarket oil cooler

 
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ideola  



Joined: 01 Oct 2004
Posts: 15318
Location: Woodstock IL

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 3:04 pm    Post subject: How to install an aftermarket oil cooler Reply with quote

Photo of raw materials


1. MOUNTING BRACKET for REMOTE FILTER MOUNT
Using a 6"x18" inch sheet of 16 gauge sheet metal (item 2), I used a hack saw to cut out a piece that measured 3" wide by 5" long. I scribed a line at two inches, and clamped this piece between a 2x4 and my work bench, leaving three inches sticking out. I then used another piece of 2x4 to bend the piece at a 90 degree angle, using a hammer for some fine tuning. I then cut angles on the bracket (item 5) to match the shape of the remote filter mount (item 6). It's hard to see this detail above, but is clearer in the finished pic below. Finishing touches were to drill holes for the remote filter mount and also to mount the bracket to the frame rail (mounting location detailed below), followed by a coat of dark blue paint to match my engine compartment.

2. MOUNTING BRACKET for OIL COOLER
Using a 48"x1" piece of 1/8" steel (item 3), I cut out a piece that was just over 26" long. Using the same technique described above, I formed two 90 degree bends, each an inch long on the ends of this piece to form the mounting bracket (item 1) for the oil cooler (item 7). Finishing touches involved drilling two holes to mount the cooler, and two holes to mount the bracket in front of the AC condensor (mounting location detailed below). Also pictured above is the block adapter (item 4).

3. MOUNTING LOCATION for OIL COOLER
Underneath the nose header panel, and in front of the rad / ac condensor, there is enough room for the oil cooler. I found very nice points on a vertically oriented, front-to-back surface between the headlight and the rad where I drilled mounting holes, as pictured below
Pass. side oil cooler mounting location from beneath the nose:

Same mounting location viewed topside:

Driver side oil cooler mounting location viewed topside


4. MOUNTING LOCATION for REMOTE FILTER MOUNT
On the passenger side frame rail, in front of the wheel well, there were already three very nicely positioned holes that were already tapped for 6mmx1.0 threads. I made a pattern of these holes when drilling the holes on the mounting surface of the bracket for the remote filter mount:


5. INSTALL PARTS!
Here is a pic of the mounted cooler from beneath the nose. As you can see, the bracket can be swivelled on its mounting points to accomodate the desired clearance and angle to keep the cooler about an inch or so from the AC condenser:


Here is a pic of the installed block adapter:


Here is a pic of the installed remote filter mount. In this photo, you can see how nice it looks having the bracket follow the shape of the top of the remote filter mount:


Here is another pic of the installed remote filter mount:


Here is another pic of the installed cooler with hoses attached:


Getting the three hoses oriented and situated was a bit of a trick...they were actually a little long, so I had to be somewhat creative in how I routed them to avoid pinch points, abrasion points, and kinks. I will be using a bunch of 8" zip ties to secure everything once I'm satisfied with how they're all routed. Getting them just right required removal of the belly pan.

SUPPLIES:
18"x6" sheet of 16 gauge sheet metal
48"x1" stick of 1/8" galvanized steel
Two 8mm x 1.0 thread x 40mm bolts for mounting cooler bracket, along with the requisite nuts and lock washers
Two 6mm x 1.0 thread x 30mm bolts for mounting the cooler to its bracket, along with the requisite lock nuts and washers
Three 8mm x 1.0 thread x 50mm bolts for mounting the remote filter mount to its bracket, along with the requisite lock nuts and washers
Three 6mm x 1.0 thread x 30mm bolts for mounting the remote filter mount bracket to the frame rail
Four 8mm washers to shim the gap between the oil cooler bracket and the mounting points on the car (the bracket ended up being 24" long, but the mounting points were just slight further apart ... I used two washers on each side to provide a flush mount).
Several 8" zip ties

TOOLS:
Hack saw with one fresh 18T blade
Drill with 8mm and 6mm bits
13mm wrench and socket
10mm wrench and socket
3/8" drive ratchet
3/8" ratchet swivel adapter
3/8" various ratchet extenders
Hammer
Two pieces of 2x4, about 1' long
Sturdy work bench
Two 4" C Clamps
_________________
15 981 GTS | 04 955 Turbo | 88 924S SE | 82 931 (x2) | 81 937 | 81 Euro 931 | 81 Weissach | 80 US 928 | 80 US 931 '941' | 80 US 931 | 80 931 GTR | 79 Sebring | 78 D-Prod (x2) | 78 Poli-Form | 78 Limited Edition | 77 Martini
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Peter_in_AU  



Joined: 29 Jul 2001
Posts: 2740
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wow that is great. The photos are great and really make the process clear.
_________________
1979 924 (Gone to a better place)
1974 Lotus 7 S4 "Big Valve" Twin-cam (waiting)
1982 924 (As featured on Wikipedia)

Learn to love your multimeter and may the search be with you
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endwrench  



Joined: 07 Dec 2002
Posts: 1629
Location: Victor, Montana

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 2:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent write-up! Where did you get the kit? How complete was it? How much did it cost?

Todd
_________________
'79 924NA. Rebuilt 9.5:1, MSDS header, Mega Squirt Injection, MJLJ-EDIS Ignition, 1.6L Whipple Charger and Intercooler, 10lbs Boost, 944 Trans, Custom HD Clutch.
"simsport" said....superchargers are better than turbos its official!....
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ideola  



Joined: 01 Oct 2004
Posts: 15318
Location: Woodstock IL

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 3:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, the oil cooler setup came used from a previous board member, Alex Roy or AznDrgn??? It included the block adapter, remote filter mount, the cooler, and all of the hoses and fittings. Everything else I bought and fabbed up.
_________________
15 981 GTS | 04 955 Turbo | 88 924S SE | 82 931 (x2) | 81 937 | 81 Euro 931 | 81 Weissach | 80 US 928 | 80 US 931 '941' | 80 US 931 | 80 931 GTR | 79 Sebring | 78 D-Prod (x2) | 78 Poli-Form | 78 Limited Edition | 77 Martini


Last edited by ideola on Tue Feb 02, 2010 2:03 am; edited 1 time in total
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pocketscience  



Joined: 23 Apr 2006
Posts: 1648
Location: Sydney, Australia... mate!

PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any chance you could update your image links? I can see the images are here: http://1up.ideola.com/images/porsche/oilcooler/

http://1up.ideola.com/images/porsche/oilcooler/


G.
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Whoever said you can't buy happiness forgot about Porsche!
81 924 N/A, GTS lights, Saratoga, interior, headers, Integral cam, EFI (sold)
94 993
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Peter_in_AU  



Joined: 29 Jul 2001
Posts: 2740
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I saved a copy. Hopefully...
_________________
1979 924 (Gone to a better place)
1974 Lotus 7 S4 "Big Valve" Twin-cam (waiting)
1982 924 (As featured on Wikipedia)

Learn to love your multimeter and may the search be with you
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ideola  



Joined: 01 Oct 2004
Posts: 15318
Location: Woodstock IL

PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should be able to fix it by creating a soft link at my hosting provider, but I can't do that until I get home tonight. I forgot when I deployed my new website that some of my links here were from my dbeckett.com domain.
_________________
15 981 GTS | 04 955 Turbo | 88 924S SE | 82 931 (x2) | 81 937 | 81 Euro 931 | 81 Weissach | 80 US 928 | 80 US 931 '941' | 80 US 931 | 80 931 GTR | 79 Sebring | 78 D-Prod (x2) | 78 Poli-Form | 78 Limited Edition | 77 Martini
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pocketscience  



Joined: 23 Apr 2006
Posts: 1648
Location: Sydney, Australia... mate!

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 12:57 pm    Post subject: Re: How to install an aftermarket oil cooler Reply with quote

ideola wrote:
Photo of raw materials


1. MOUNTING BRACKET for REMOTE FILTER MOUNT
Using a 6"x18" inch sheet of 16 gauge sheet metal (item 2), I used a hack saw to cut out a piece that measured 3" wide by 5" long. I scribed a line at two inches, and clamped this piece between a 2x4 and my work bench, leaving three inches sticking out. I then used another piece of 2x4 to bend the piece at a 90 degree angle, using a hammer for some fine tuning. I then cut angles on the bracket (item 5) to match the shape of the remote filter mount (item 6). It's hard to see this detail above, but is clearer in the finished pic below. Finishing touches were to drill holes for the remote filter mount and also to mount the bracket to the frame rail (mounting location detailed below), followed by a coat of dark blue paint to match my engine compartment.

2. MOUNTING BRACKET for OIL COOLER
Using a 48"x1" piece of 1/8" steel (item 3), I cut out a piece that was just over 26" long. Using the same technique described above, I formed two 90 degree bends, each an inch long on the ends of this piece to form the mounting bracket (item 1) for the oil cooler (item 7). Finishing touches involved drilling two holes to mount the cooler, and two holes to mount the bracket in front of the AC condensor (mounting location detailed below). Also pictured above is the block adapter (item 4).

3. MOUNTING LOCATION for OIL COOLER
Underneath the nose header panel, and in front of the rad / ac condensor, there is enough room for the oil cooler. I found very nice points on a vertically oriented, front-to-back surface between the headlight and the rad where I drilled mounting holes, as pictured below
Pass. side oil cooler mounting location from beneath the nose:

Same mounting location viewed topside:

Driver side oil cooler mounting location viewed topside


4. MOUNTING LOCATION for REMOTE FILTER MOUNT
On the passenger side frame rail, in front of the wheel well, there were already three very nicely positioned holes that were already tapped for 6mmx1.0 threads. I made a pattern of these holes when drilling the holes on the mounting surface of the bracket for the remote filter mount:


5. INSTALL PARTS!
Here is a pic of the mounted cooler from beneath the nose. As you can see, the bracket can be swivelled on its mounting points to accomodate the desired clearance and angle to keep the cooler about an inch or so from the AC condenser:


Here is a pic of the installed block adapter:


Here is a pic of the installed remote filter mount. In this photo, you can see how nice it looks having the bracket follow the shape of the top of the remote filter mount:


Here is another pic of the installed remote filter mount:


Here is another pic of the installed cooler with hoses attached:


Getting the three hoses oriented and situated was a bit of a trick...they were actually a little long, so I had to be somewhat creative in how I routed them to avoid pinch points, abrasion points, and kinks. I will be using a bunch of 8" zip ties to secure everything once I'm satisfied with how they're all routed. Getting them just right required removal of the belly pan.

SUPPLIES:
18"x6" sheet of 16 gauge sheet metal
48"x1" stick of 1/8" galvanized steel
Two 8mm x 1.0 thread x 40mm bolts for mounting cooler bracket, along with the requisite nuts and lock washers
Two 6mm x 1.0 thread x 30mm bolts for mounting the cooler to its bracket, along with the requisite lock nuts and washers
Three 8mm x 1.0 thread x 50mm bolts for mounting the remote filter mount to its bracket, along with the requisite lock nuts and washers
Three 6mm x 1.0 thread x 30mm bolts for mounting the remote filter mount bracket to the frame rail
Four 8mm washers to shim the gap between the oil cooler bracket and the mounting points on the car (the bracket ended up being 24" long, but the mounting points were just slight further apart ... I used two washers on each side to provide a flush mount).
Several 8" zip ties

TOOLS:
Hack saw with one fresh 18T blade
Drill with 8mm and 6mm bits
13mm wrench and socket
10mm wrench and socket
3/8" drive ratchet
3/8" ratchet swivel adapter
3/8" various ratchet extenders
Hammer
Two pieces of 2x4, about 1' long
Sturdy work bench
Two 4" C Clamps

_________________
Whoever said you can't buy happiness forgot about Porsche!
81 924 N/A, GTS lights, Saratoga, interior, headers, Integral cam, EFI (sold)
94 993
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Martijnus  



Joined: 29 Dec 2006
Posts: 2020
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2008 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the people who are interested, I've been looking for a sandwich plate and found these from Mocal:

http://64.202.180.37/files/sp1t.pdf

There not that expensive and have a built in oil thermostat!
I've paid the same amount of money for the thermostat only on my bike (which is inteded for cars).

The downside is that you don't have a seperate filter, which could be handy if the clearance turns out to be too little (exhaust?)

There are without a doubt smaller filters to overcome this problem but that's not the right way imho...

another option in this case is taking the non-thermostat sandwichplate, using a smaller filter to overcome clearance problems, and mount a seperate filter + thermostat (o man, I don't want to emphasize how important a thermostat is) between the lines.

This way you have 2 filters... with even more filter capacity

by the way...this can also be done with the thermostat-plate...except the small filter on the plate serves as a 'cold start' filter, and the external filter takes out everything which goes to the cooler.

Too bad I dont know how the thermostat works inside... I got a nice diagram with my other thermostat.

It could also be that the small plate-filter takes out everything and the seperate filter gets 'clean' oil...which makes it redundant. and since the plate filter is smaller the replacing intervals change...so keep that in mind....

well, I'm buying one... I'll post if it satisfies me.
_________________
"Rule: Turbo's make torque, and torque makes fun." (C. Bell)

924 "50-jahre", 1981.
MSII/extra, LPG, ITB's, 5lug.
To be turbo'ed in a while.
Killed her at the Nurburgring, Porscheless at the moment
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