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Replacing Press-Fit A-arm bushings

 
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-nick  



Joined: 16 Nov 2002
Posts: 2699
Location: Cambridge, MA

PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 6:07 am    Post subject: Replacing Press-Fit A-arm bushings Reply with quote

I've got a new pair of stock rubber bushings for the rear of the front a-arms. Has anyone managed to do R&R them themselves? Will a bearing puller do the job to pull the old ones off? then a hammer + block of wood to install the new ones? Is there a pin or something to make sure the bushings go on straight? (since they need to be spun in the correct direction)

Any advice is appreciated!

nick
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Chrenan  



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 3899
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nick, I try to as much as I can myself, but last summer this was something I took to a shop to have done. I made no progress on any of the A-arm bushings by myself. Went to a local independent porsche shop and they pressed the old ones out and put the new ones in, cost a few bucks but probably saved me a whole afternoon of aggravation.
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augidog  



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Posts: 1360
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a garage guy do mine when he had the shocks .
I got tired of the hammer and block of wood making me look silly in front of my wife.
All he did was use a big mounted bench press ,the type you see on every old workbench. He just cranked it together.
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Slam  



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 1689
Location: Wainwright, Alberta, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with these guys. Major PITA. I managed to do the rear ones, with the aid of a lot of heat, but by the time I got them off I'd had enough and took the A-arms to a pro.
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Raceboy  



Joined: 01 Mar 2004
Posts: 2318
Location: Estonia, Europe

PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did them myself.
First one was kinda pita, but second arm was already done with ther experience. I used vice and bolt to push the front A-arm bushing out and new one in. The rears depend on the year. Older style bushings are easy to replace but newer need some serious work with hammer and a lot of patience.
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Mike924  



Joined: 12 Aug 2004
Posts: 2601
Location: IoW UK

PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the past when I've fitted bushes (on other cars) I've used red rubber grease to ease then in; makes a world of difference.

Does anyone know if these bushes are available in polyurethane?

Also how do you go about resetting the castor alignment, having removed the A-arm?

Sorry, don't mean to hijack, but it's kinda related.
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-nick  



Joined: 16 Nov 2002
Posts: 2699
Location: Cambridge, MA

PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 1:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ok, off to the shop with these babies then!

Mike- the trouble is that the stock bushings have a metal sleeve in the center that is a light press over the metal pivot of the a-arm. Grease or no grease, still a lot of banging.

I'm sure there is a poly alternative, but I'm a fan of stock rubber bushings. I've tried poly/delrin/whatever at other suspension points and only got a sloppy fit and noise.

Alignment = computerized alignment machine at a shop for me. I get a nice printout of the results and everything
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Vince Ponz  



Joined: 03 Nov 2002
Posts: 3581
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad you asked. While trying to remove the metal tube I struck it with a hammer only to have it rebound and chip my eye tooth. Slightly.

I did get to finish the project.
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Peter  



Joined: 04 Nov 2002
Posts: 379
Location: New York, NY

PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The stock rubber bushings come off easily by burning them off. I used an inexpensive propane torch, similar to what plumbers use to sweat pipes, to burn the rubber off.

I havenít yet replaced the bushings, but I am using polyurethane bushings, not rubber. I need to determine how I can cut grease channels, with the tools at my disposal, on the inner diameter of the poly bushings to allow periodic lubrication through the zerk fittings. This is to prevent binding. ALL poly bushings bind if they are not lubed, even if you donít feel or hear them. But for a non-track car, rubber is best way to go!

I would suggest to forego the wood block route, and either have your mechanic press them in at the shop, or use a large vise as a home press. Do one ribber side first, then do the metal sleeve, then do the other rubber side.
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Llamaguy  



Joined: 02 Jul 2003
Posts: 711
Location: Indiana

PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



are you talking about the one on the left or the right? (picture right is the front of car)

The left one just slipped on and I can't remember taking it off, but it didn't seem hard. The right one was a pain because I don't have a press, but went in with a large vice.
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